Zero Drafting: How to Start Writing Without an Outline

Do you ever feel paralyzed when it comes time to start writing? You know what you want to say, but you can’t seem to get started. This is where zero drafting can help.

What is a zero draft? I hear you ask.

Simply put, with the zero drafting approach, you don’t need an outline or any other type of plan; you simply start writing and see where the words take you.

Simple enough, right? But you will soon learn that there is method to the madness.

In this blog post, we will discuss how zero drafting can help you start writing without any stress or anxiety. We’ll also provide tips for getting the most out of this approach.

Are you ready to try zero drafting?

Zero Drafting: How to Start Writing Without an Outline

One Method, Many Names

Just like anything else in life, everyone has their own way of doing things. The same goes for writing a story. Some people like to outline everything before they even start writing, while others just sit down and start typing away until they have a complete story.

This latter method is called zero drafting, and it can be a great way to get your ideas down on paper without getting bogged down in the details . Zero drafting simply means writing until you have the story told, without stopping to edit or revise.

This can be a great way to get all of your ideas out, without worrying about making them perfect. The first draft will be a revised version or it may be your final draft- it just depends on your process and how well it works for you.

The process of zero drafting has many names, such as discovery draft, pre-draft, initial draft, blueprint, original draft, early draft, or first outline.

But regardless of what you call it, the goal is the same: to get the story told.

This can be achieved in a variety of ways, but the most important thing is to just keep writing until you reach the end.

Tell The Story

Tell The Story

Zero drafting is all about letting your creativity flow freely and not being afraid to take risks. This is in contrast to traditional writing processes, which typically involve painstaking attention to detail and meticulous planning.

With zero drafting, the goal is simply to tell the whole story, even if it means using poor grammar or no punctuation at all.

Whether you’re working on short stories, poems, novels, or other forms of writing, zero drafting gives you the freedom and flexibility to explore your ideas without worrying too much about making mistakes or getting things “right”.

So if you’re looking for a more creative and spontaneous approach to writing, zero drafting might just be for you! It is also easier to calculate how long it will take you to finish your book, as you aren’t worrying about drafts.

Follow The Rules, Or Don’t! The Choice Is Yours

Follow The Rules, Or Don't! The Choice Is Yours

One of the best things about writing a zero draft is that you can play around with different styles and voices until you find the one that best suits your story.

You can also experiment with scene structure, using traditional rules or breaking them entirely. The goal is simply to get the story down on paper, without worrying about perfection.

Once you have a general idea of the scenes you want to write, you can start fleshing them out in more detail. This is where you need to decide whether to show or tell the story.

If you have a strong image in your mind, you may want to write a traditional scene.

However, if you’re not sure what should happen next, telling the story may be a better option. Either way, the important thing is to keep writing and see where the story takes you.

Get It Written; Revise It Later

Many writers find it difficult to start writing a new piece, especially if they are trying to come up with something original or unique.

But the truth is that getting your ideas onto the page – even in a preliminary form – is always the first step in good writing.

After all, it’s only by revising and rewriting that your ideas will reach their full potential. So don’t be afraid to just dive in and get something down on paper – revise later, and you’ll be amazed at how much more powerful your writing can be. 

What About The Five Plot Points?

While there is no one “right” way to write a story, some writers find it helpful to think in terms of five key plot points:

-The Hook: This is the first scene or chapter that grabs the reader’s attention and makes them want to keep reading.

-The Inciting Incident: This is the event that sets the story in motion and changes the protagonist’s life.

-The First Plot Point: This is a major turning point that propels the story forward and raises the stakes for the protagonist.

-The Midpoint: This is another turning point that signals a change in direction, often leading to the second half of the story.

-The Third Plot Point: This is the climax of the story, where the protagonist must face their greatest challenge and make a difficult choice.

With zero drafting, you wouldn’t necessarily focus on these but because you already know the story, they will naturally fall into place.

There is no hard and fast rule here, so if it helps to think about these while zero drafting, go for it!

But if you find that it’s too restrictive, feel free to ignore it entirely and just let the story take you where it will.

Key Takeaways

  1. Zero drafting is a great way to get your ideas down on paper without getting bogged down in the details.
  2. The goal of zero drafting is simply to tell the whole story, even if it means using poor grammar or no punctuation at all.
  3. With zero drafting, you can play around with different styles and voices until you find the one that best suits your story.
  4. The important thing is to keep writing and see where the story takes you.
  5. Don’t be afraid to just dive in and get something down on paper – revise later, and you’ll be amazed at how much more powerful your writing can be. 

Who Is Zero Drafting For?

  • Anyone who is looking for an alternative to the traditional outline.
  • Anyone who finds it difficult to come up with all the details of their story in one sitting.
  • Whether you are new to writing or an experienced writer, zero drafting can be a useful tool to help move your creative process forward and complete your story.
  • Anybody who would benefit from a more freeform approach to outlining; can create an expanded synopsis of your ideas and use it as a starting point for the actual writing process.
  • Anybody who finds it easier breaking down a story into smaller chunks; can escape the cycle of never finishing what you start and instead move closer to the end.

Youtube Videos About Zero Drafting And Other Ideas To Get Your Book Written

https://youtu.be/SPMkA5Lv4Ec

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